EPPO Global Database

Agrilus planipennis(AGRLPL)

Photos

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For publication in journals, books or magazines, permission should be obtained from the original photographers with a copy to EPPO.

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Galleries of Agrilus planipennis.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

Larva of Agrilus planipennis and frass.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

Same ash lined street after infestation by Agrilus planipennis.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

Galleries of Agrilus planipennis.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

Healthy ash lined street before infestation by Agrilus planipennis.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

Old galleries of Agrilus planipennis on a dead tree

Courtesy: Muriel Suffert (EPPO)

Exit hole (Ottawa, June 2010)

Courtesy: Jean-François Germain - Plant Health Laboratory, Montpellier (FR)

Adult (Ottawa, June 2010)

Courtesy: Jean-François Germain - Plant Health Laboratory, Montpellier (FR)

Exit hole and adult (Ottawa, June 2010)

Courtesy: Jean-François Germain - Plant Health Laboratory, Montpellier (FR)

Exit holes (Ottawa, June 2010)

Courtesy: Jean-François Germain - Plant Health Laboratory, Montpellier (FR)

Exit hole of Agrilus planipennis

Courtesy: Muriel Suffert (EPPO)

The loss of foliage caused by beetle feeding can be remarkable

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

The adult of EAB occurs in June - July

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

EAB is strong flier. During the flight, the contrast purple abdomen is exposed.

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

First year of infestation by EAB

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Nymph of the spined soldier bug (Podisus maculiventris) found in EAB an easy prey

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

EAB attack begins in the crown

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

EAB kills infested tree within 1-3 years

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

The name "Ash Lane" on Experimental Farm in Ottawa has no sense anymore ...

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Epicormic branches are symptomatic for EAB infestation

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Head is retracted into 3 segmented thorax. The rest of the body is 10 segmented abdomen

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Beetles are lured by color and later also by glued specimens

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Except for exit holes, an attack is indicated by cracks and changes in bark color

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Flat and broad larva hatches from egg

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

The three-sided green sticky prism traps are widely used for prediction and monitoring of EAB

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Exit holes are reliable symptom of attack.

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Mature larva is 25-35 mm long

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Characteristic D-shape exit holes are distinctive for all Agrilus species

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Females are well camouflaged on the bark

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Ottawa, September 2012. The first symptoms of infestation. Untimely yellowing and thinning of foliage caused by larval activity

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Remnant of emerging EAB - some adults fail to get out

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Egs are laid by a long mebraneous telescoping ovipositor allowing precise oviposition deep into bark crevices

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Larva of all Agrilus species is distinctive by abdominal apical pair of serrate styles

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Oviposition occurs in the later part of warm, sunny days. Females lay egs in the obscure places in the bark.

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

During the mating, the male is hooked on the female by first two pairs of legs ...

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

After several days of feeding on ash foliage, adults are ready to mate

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Mature larva pupates in the pupal chamber, adult beetle emerges through exit hole

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Larval S-shaped, frass-filled tunnels are visible on inner bark and outer sapwood

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Damage caused by larval activity to still living tree

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Damage caused by larval activity

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Larva bores flat tunnels throughout the bast and outer sapwood

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

The spined soldier bug (Podisus maculiventris) is a generalist predator with a broad host range. This is the first proof it attacks also EAB

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a striking beetle native in East Asia

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Ash borer moth (Podosesia syringae) loves weakened ashes. Its presence may indicate A. planipennis infestation

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Resting and feeding beetles are inconspicious due to their color

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Male is using its exserted sclerotized genital at copulation

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek

Adult Agrilus planipennis.

Courtesy: Daniel A. Herms, The Ohio State University (US).

To reach sexual maturity, both sexes feed on the ash foliage. This type of leaf damage is defined as "margin feeding". Feeding is often accompanied by characteristic droppings

Courtesy: Eduard Jendek